Regulation of bovine papillomavirus type 1 gene expression by RNA processing

Front Biosci (Landmark Ed). 2009 Jan 1;14:1270-82. doi: 10.2741/3307.

Abstract

Bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) has served as a prototype for studying the molecular biology and pathogenesis of papillomaviruses. The expression of BPV-1 early and late genes is highly regulated at both transcription and post-transcriptional levels and strictly tied to the differentiation of keratinocytes. BPV-1 infects keratinocytes in the basal layer of the skin and replicates in the nucleus of infected cells in a differentiation-dependent manner. Although viral early genes begin to be expressed from the infected, undifferentiated basal cells, viral late genes are not expressed until the infected cells enter the terminal differentiation stage. Both BPV-1 early and late transcripts are intron-containing bicistronic or polycistronic RNAs, bearing more than one open reading frame and are polyadenylated at either an early or late poly (A) site. Nuclear RNA processing of these transcripts by RNA splicing and poly (A) site selection has been extensively analyzed in the past decade and various viral cis-elements and cellular factors involved in regulation of viral RNA processing were discovered, leading to our better understanding of the gene expression and biology of human papillomaviruses.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Bovine papillomavirus 1 / genetics*
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Viral*
  • Poly A / metabolism
  • RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional*
  • RNA Splicing
  • RNA, Viral / genetics
  • RNA, Viral / metabolism

Substances

  • RNA, Viral
  • Poly A