Number of teeth and myocardial infarction and stroke among elderly never smokers

J Negat Results Biomed. 2009 Apr 22;8:6. doi: 10.1186/1477-5751-8-6.

Abstract

Background: In most previous studies the association between number of teeth and cardiovascular diseases has been found to be stronger among younger age groups than in older age groups, which indicates that age may modify the association between number of teeth and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the association between tooth loss and atherosclerotic vascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and stroke in a homogeneous elderly population. The study population was comprised of a subpopulation of 392 community-living elderly people who participated in the population-based Kuopio 75+ study. The data were collected through an interview, a structured clinical health examination and from patient records. The main outcome measures were a history of diagnosed myocardial infarction and diagnosed ischemic stroke. Prevalence proportion ratios (PPR) were estimated using generalised linear models.

Results: Edentate subjects had a weakly, statistically non-significantly increased likelihood of a history of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke compared with dentate subjects. Those with a large number of teeth had a slightly, but not statistically significantly increased likelihood of a history of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke compared with those with a small number of teeth.

Conclusion: These data did not show evidence that total or partial tooth loss would be associated with atherosclerotic vascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke among an elderly population aged 75 years or older.

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Demography
  • Female
  • Finland / epidemiology
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Myocardial Infarction / complications*
  • Myocardial Infarction / epidemiology*
  • Prevalence
  • Risk Factors
  • Smoking / epidemiology
  • Stroke / complications*
  • Stroke / epidemiology*
  • Tooth Loss / complications*
  • Tooth Loss / epidemiology*