Fast dixon-based multisequence and multiplanar MRI for whole-body detection of cancer metastases

J Magn Reson Imaging. 2009 May;29(5):1154-62. doi: 10.1002/jmri.21746.

Abstract

Purpose: To develop and demonstrate the feasibility of multisequence and multiplanar MRI for whole-body cancer detection.

Materials and methods: Two fast Dixon-based sequences and a diffusion-weighted sequence were used on a commercially available 1.5 T scanner for whole-body cancer detection. The study enrolled 19 breast cancer patients with known metastases and in multistations acquired whole-body axial diffusion-weighted, coronal T2-weighted, axial/sagittal pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted, as well as triphasic abdomen images. Three radiologists subjectively scored Dixon images of each series for overall image quality and fat suppression uniformity on a 4-point scale (1 = poor, 2 = fair, 3 = good, and 4 = excellent).

Results: Eighteen of the 19 patients completed the whole-body MRI successfully. The mean acquisition time and overall patient table time were 46 +/- 3 and 69 +/- 5 minutes, respectively. The average radiologists' scores for overall image quality and fat suppression uniformity were both 3.4 +/- 0.5. The image quality was consistent between patients and all completed whole-body examinations were diagnostically adequate.

Conclusion: Whole-body MRI offering essentially all the most optimal tumor-imaging sequences in a typical 1-hour time slot can potentially become an appealing "one-stop-shop" for whole-body cancer imaging.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Algorithms
  • Breast Neoplasms / pathology*
  • Breast Neoplasms / secondary*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Image Enhancement / methods*
  • Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted / methods*
  • Imaging, Three-Dimensional / methods*
  • Lymphatic Metastasis
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
  • Whole Body Imaging / methods*