Segregation and disparities in health services use

Med Care Res Rev. 2009 Oct;66(5):578-89. doi: 10.1177/1077558709336445. Epub 2009 May 21.

Abstract

We compared race disparities in health services use in a national sample of adults from the 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and data from the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities Project, a 2003 survey of adult residents from a low-income integrated urban community in Maryland. In the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data, African Americans were less likely to have a health care visit compared with Whites. However, in the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities Project, the integrated community, African Americans were more likely to have a health care visit than Whites. The race disparities in the incidence rate of health care use among persons who had at least one visit were similar in both samples. Our findings suggest that disparities in health care utilization may differ across communities and that residential segregation may be a confounding factor.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans / statistics & numerical data*
  • Baltimore
  • Data Collection
  • Education
  • European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
  • Health Services / statistics & numerical data*
  • Healthcare Disparities*
  • Humans
  • Income
  • Likelihood Functions
  • Minority Health*
  • Models, Statistical
  • Odds Ratio
  • Prejudice*
  • Urban Population