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. 2009 May 22;5(4):351-65.
doi: 10.7150/ijbs.5.351.

Characterization of the Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Giant Silkworm Moth, Eriogyna Pyretorum (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

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Free PMC article

Characterization of the Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Giant Silkworm Moth, Eriogyna Pyretorum (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

Shao-Tong Jiang et al. Int J Biol Sci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Eriogyna pyretorum (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) was determined as being composed of 15,327 base pairs (bp), including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and a control region. The arrangement of the PCGs is the same as that found in the other sequenced lepidopteran. The AT skewness for the E. pyretorum mitogenome is slightly negative (-0.031), indicating the occurrence of more Ts than As. The nucleotide composition of the E. pyretorum mitogenome is also biased toward A + T nucleotides (80.82%). All PCGs are initiated by ATN codons, except for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 2 (cox1 and cox2). Two of the 13 PCGs harbor the incomplete termination codon by T. All tRNA genes have a typical clover-leaf structure of mitochondrial tRNA, with the exception of trnS1(AGN) and trnS2(UCN). Phylogenetic analysis among the available lepidopteran species supports the current morphology-based hypothesis that Bombycoidea, Geometroidea, Notodontidea, Papilionoidea and Pyraloidea are monophyletic. As has been previously suggested, Bombycidae (Bombyx mori and Bombyx mandarina), Sphingoidae (Manduca sexta) and Saturniidae (Antheraea pernyi, Antheraea yamamai, E. pyretorum and Caligula boisduvalii) formed a group.

Keywords: Eriogyna pyretorum; Lepidoptera Saturniidae; mitochondrial genome.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of Interest: The authors have declared that no conflict of interest exists.

Figures

Fig 1
Fig 1
Map of the mitochondrial genome of E. pyretorum. The abbreviations for the genes are as follows: cox1, cox2, and cox3 refer to the cytochrome oxidase subunits, cob refers to cytochrome b, and nad1-6 refers to NADH dehydrogenase components. tRNAs are denoted as one-letter symbol according to the IUPAC-IUB single-letter amino acid codes. The overlapping fragments ER1-10 are shown as single lines within a circle.
Fig 2
Fig 2
Putative secondary structures for the tRNA genes of the E. pyretorum mitogenome.
Fig 2
Fig 2
Putative secondary structures for the tRNA genes of the E. pyretorum mitogenome.
Fig 2
Fig 2
Putative secondary structures for the tRNA genes of the E. pyretorum mitogenome.
Fig 3
Fig 3
Phylogeny of the lepidopteran species. Phylogenetic tree estimation from the mitogenome sequences of selected insects obtained with nucleotide dataset (A) and amino acid dataset (B) using BI analysis and ML analysis. (C) The most recent consensus view of lepidopteran relationships after Kristensen & Skalski (1999) . D. yakuba , D. melanogaster , L. migratoria and A. gambiae were used as outgroups. The numbers above branches specify posterior probabilities from Bayesian inference (BI). The numbers under branches specify bootstrap percentages from maximum likelihood (ML,1000 replicates). /, denotes a value below 50% in the ML tree.
Fig 3
Fig 3
Phylogeny of the lepidopteran species. Phylogenetic tree estimation from the mitogenome sequences of selected insects obtained with nucleotide dataset (A) and amino acid dataset (B) using BI analysis and ML analysis. (C) The most recent consensus view of lepidopteran relationships after Kristensen & Skalski (1999) . D. yakuba , D. melanogaster , L. migratoria and A. gambiae were used as outgroups. The numbers above branches specify posterior probabilities from Bayesian inference (BI). The numbers under branches specify bootstrap percentages from maximum likelihood (ML,1000 replicates). /, denotes a value below 50% in the ML tree.
Fig 3
Fig 3
Phylogeny of the lepidopteran species. Phylogenetic tree estimation from the mitogenome sequences of selected insects obtained with nucleotide dataset (A) and amino acid dataset (B) using BI analysis and ML analysis. (C) The most recent consensus view of lepidopteran relationships after Kristensen & Skalski (1999) . D. yakuba , D. melanogaster , L. migratoria and A. gambiae were used as outgroups. The numbers above branches specify posterior probabilities from Bayesian inference (BI). The numbers under branches specify bootstrap percentages from maximum likelihood (ML,1000 replicates). /, denotes a value below 50% in the ML tree.

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