Associations between the five-factor model of personality and health behaviors among college students

J Am Coll Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;58(1):73-81. doi: 10.3200/JACH.58.1.73-82.

Abstract

Objective: In fall 2006, the authors examined associations between the five-factor model of personality and several key health behaviors.

Methods: College students (N = 583) completed the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment and the International Personality Item Pool Big Five short-form questionnaire.

Results: Highly conscientious individuals were more likely to wear seat belts, utilize alcohol-related harm reduction, exercise, get enough sleep, and consume fruits and vegetables. They were also less likely to smoke cigarettes, consume alcohol, and binge drink. Highly extraverted individuals were more likely to smoke cigarettes, consume alcohol, binge drink, and have multiple sexual partners, and they were less likely to engage in alcohol-related harm reduction, use condoms, and get enough sleep.

Conclusions: These findings are supportive of a growing body of evidence indicating that conscientiousness and extraversion are robust concomitants of health behaviors among college students.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Alcoholism
  • Female
  • Health Behavior*
  • Humans
  • Iowa
  • Linear Models
  • Male
  • Models, Psychological
  • Nutritional Status
  • Personality Tests*
  • Personality*
  • Risk-Taking
  • Smoking
  • Social Perception
  • Students*
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • United States
  • Universities*
  • Young Adult