Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 10 (3), 184-8

Circulating Bone Marrow Stem/Progenitor Cells in Vascular Atherogenesis and in the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Coronary Stenosis

Affiliations

Circulating Bone Marrow Stem/Progenitor Cells in Vascular Atherogenesis and in the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Coronary Stenosis

Emma L Soboleva et al. Exp Clin Cardiol.

Abstract

Using autopsy specimens and clonal technique, the authors showed that hematopoietic and stromal stem colony-forming units are present in human atheromatous vascular intima. Stromal colony-forming units were also detected in the mononuclear fraction of the blood of patients with hyperlipidemia and coronary stenosis, and were not found in the peripheral blood of normolipidemic volunteers. Using flow cytometry, the absence of stromal circulating colony-forming units in healthy volunteers and their presence in coronary patients was confirmed. It was thought that the presence of circulating stromal precursors with a certain phenotype and variations in their level in blood could serve as an informative noninvasive indicator of coronary stenosis.

Keywords: Atherosclerosis; Hematopoietic and stromal colony-forming units; Stem/progenitor cells.

Figures

Figure 1)
Figure 1)
Hematopoietic colonies in semisolid cultures of intimal cells from a lipid streak of human aorta. A A mixed granulocyte-macrophage colony (Giemsa staining; original magnification ×40). B A monocyte/macrophage colony (staining for nonspecific esterase; original magnification ×160). C A basophyl/mast cell colony (toluidine blue staining; original magnification ×400)
Figure 2)
Figure 2)
Stromal colonies in cultures of intimal cells from a lipid streak of human aorta. A A stromal colony in semisolid culture (electron microscopy, original magnification ×1300; inset: inverted microscope, original magnification ×130). B A fragment of colony (A) in semisolid culture (electron microscopy, original magnification ×2600). C Bone matrix in liquid culture surrounded by osteoblast-like cells (electron microscopy, original magnification ×8300)
Figure 3)
Figure 3)
Stromal colonies in semisolid cultures of blood mononuclears from patients with primary hyperlipidemia and coronary stenosis. A,B Fibroblast-like cells synthesize organized fibrillar matrix (electron microscopy, original magnification ×8300). C Osteoid matrix with bone lamella and fragment of osteoclast (OC) (electron microscopy, original magnification ×2600)
Figure 4)
Figure 4)
Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of osteonectin (ON)-positive cells in peripheral blood. A A healthy volunteer with isotype-matched antibodies (control). B A healthy volunteer with anti-ON antibodies. C A patient with coronary atherosclerosis and isotype-matched antibodies (control). D A patient with coronary atherosclerosis and anti-ON antibodies. FITC Fluorescein 5′-isothio-cyanate; Ig Immunoglobulin
Figure 5)
Figure 5)
Comparison of two patients who had undergone bypass surgery five years previously. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of the number of osteonectin (ON)-positive cells in the peripheral blood (lymphocyte-like cells CD45medium/low and CD34-negative). A Patient K, functional coronary artery grafts: 126 ON-positive cells per 100,000 white blood cells. B Patient L, critical stenosis of coronary arteries and coronary artery grafts: 1550 ON-positive cells per 100,000 white blood cells. FITC Fluorescein 5′-isothiocyanate

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 1 article

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback