Human papillomavirus in saliva of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2009 Oct 1;14(10):e525-8. doi: 10.4317/medoral.14.e525.

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in saliva rinses of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and to analyze the possibility of using saliva as a diagnostic method for screening high-risk patients.

Study design: The saliva sample of 22 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and 20 age-sex matched healthy controls were obtained. The presence of HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, and 33 was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

Results: In 40.9% of the patients and in 25% of the controls, the saliva was shown to be positive for HPV. In 27.3% of the patients and in 20% of the controls, the saliva was shown to be positive for HPV16; and none of the controls, except one patient was shown to be positive for HPV 18. Neither patients nor controls were positive for HPV 31 and 33. These differences were not statistically significant.

Conclusions: The results of this study were unable to support the detection of HPV in saliva rinses as a diagnostic method for OSCC.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Alphapapillomavirus / isolation & purification*
  • Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / virology*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Mouth Neoplasms / virology*
  • Saliva / virology*