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Randomized Controlled Trial
. 2009 Sep 1;14(9):406-12.
doi: 10.1186/2047-783x-14-9-406.

Echinacea/sage or Chlorhexidine/Lidocaine for Treating Acute Sore Throats: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial

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Free PMC article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Echinacea/sage or Chlorhexidine/Lidocaine for Treating Acute Sore Throats: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial

Andreas Schapowal et al. Eur J Med Res. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: The aim of this trial was to assess the relative efficacy of a sage/echinacea spray and a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats.

Methods: This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy controlled trial carried out in eleven general practices in Switzerland. A total of 154 patients (133 analyzed in per protocol collective) at least 12 years old with acute sore throat present for not more than 72 hours prior to inclusion and with a throat score >/=6 participated in the study. They used either an echinacea/sage spray or a chlorhexidine/ lidocaine spray with two puffs every 2 hours, in a double-dummy blinded manner, up to 10 times daily until they were symptom-free, for a maximum of 5 days. The main outcome measures was the comparison of response rates during the first three days. A response was defined as a decrease of at least 50% of the total symptoms compared to baseline.

Results: The echinacea/sage treatment exhibited similar efficacy to the chlorhexidine/lidocaine treatment in reducing sore throat symptoms during the first 3 days (P(x<Y) = .5083). Response rates after 3 days were 63.8% in the echinacea/sage group and 57.8% in the chlorhexidine/lidocaine group. For all secondary parameters, such as time to becoming symptom free, throat pain, and global assessments of efficacy by the physician and patient, no difference between the two treatments was seen. They were both very well tolerated.

Conclusion: An echinacea/sage preparation is as efficacious and well tolerated as a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00707902.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flow chart of participants in the trial.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Relative frequency of patients with reduction in the sore throat score by at least 50% during the first 3 days of treatment of the per protocol population (n = 133). The grey bars represent the chlorhexidine/lidocaine (n = 64) and the black bars the echinacea/sage treatment (n = 69). (P = .5083, Mann-Whitney-Statistic).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Reduction of the total symptom score (per protocol collective) during 5 days of treatment of the per protocol population (n = 133). The grey triangles show the chlorhexidine/lidocaine (n = 64) and the black circles the echinacea/sage treatment (n = 69).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Assessment of efficacy at the end of the treatment by investigators and patients (per protocol population, n = 133). (A = investigators, B = patients).

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