Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 15 (8), 1260-4

Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, United States

Affiliations

Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, United States

Stephen G Jenkins et al. Emerg Infect Dis.

Abstract

During year 6 (2005-2006) of the Prospective Resistant Organism Tracking and Epidemiology for the Ketolide Telithromycin surveillance study, 6,747 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were collected at 119 centers. The susceptibility of these isolates to macrolides was compared with data from previous years. Macrolide resistance increased significantly in year 6 (35.3%) from the stable rate of approximately 30% for the previous 3 years (p<0.0001). Macrolide resistance increased in all regions of the United States and for all patient age groups. Rates were highest in the south and for children 0-2 years of age. Lower-level efflux [mef(A)]-mediated macrolide resistance decreased in prevalence to approximately 50%, and highly resistant [erm(B) + mef(A)] strains increased to 25%. Telithromycin and levofloxacin susceptibility rates were >99% and >98%, respectively, irrespective of genotype. Pneumococcal macrolide resistance in the United States showed its first significant increase since 2000. High-level macrolide resistance is also increasing.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Increased prevalence of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (ERSP), by age group, Prospective Resistant Organism Tracking and Epidemiology for the Ketolide Telithromycin, United States surveillance study, years 1–6 (2000–2006).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Increased prevalence in the erm(B) + mef(A) macrolide resistance genotype from year 1 (2000–2001) to year 6 (2005−2006), Prospective Resistant Organism Tracking and Epidemiology for the Ketolide Telithromycin, United States surveillance study.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 31 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. File TM The epidemiology of respiratory tract infections. Semin Respir Infect 2000;15:184–94 10.1053/srin.2000.18059 - DOI - PubMed
    1. Mandell LA, Wunderink RG, Anzuetto A, Bartlett JG, Campbell GD, Dean NC, et al. Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society consensus guidelines on the management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Clin Infect Dis 2007;44:S27–72 10.1086/511159 - DOI - PubMed
    1. Doern GV, Richter SS, Miller A, Miller N, Rice C, Heilmann K, et al. Antimicrobial resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae in the United States: have we begun to turn the corner on resistance to certain antimicrobial classes? Clin Infect Dis 2005;41:139–48 10.1086/430906 - DOI - PubMed
    1. Jenkins SG, Brown SD, Farrell DJ Trends in antibacterial resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in the USA: update from PROTEKT US years 1–4. Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob 2008;7:1 10.1186/1476-0711-7-1 - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Sahm DF, Benninger MS, Evangelista AT, Yee YC, Thornsberry C, Brown NP Antimicrobial resistance trends among sinus isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the United States (2001–2005). Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2007;136:385–9 10.1016/j.otohns.2006.09.016 - DOI - PubMed

Publication types

MeSH terms

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback