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, 120 (16), 1623-32

Cardioversion: Past, Present, and Future

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Cardioversion: Past, Present, and Future

Ivan Cakulev et al. Circulation.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
An apparatus similar to Charles Kite’s, built and successfully used by Fell, as described in the 1792 issue of the Gentleman’s Magazine. Courtesy of Mark Gulezian, Takoma Park.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Claude S. Beck, MD. Courtesy of the Dittrick Medical History Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Beck’s defibrillator. Courtesy of the Dittrick Medical History Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Naum L. Gurvich, MD. Courtesy of Margarita Bogushevich, MD.
Figure 5
Figure 5
The first DC defibrillator ID-1-VEI for external transthoracic and internal use made in the USSR in 1952. Paddles and cords were stored in the separate metal box, which is leaning on the device. The defibrillator in this picture was given in 1958 to Dr Robert Hosler, an associate of Dr Claude Beck, by Dr Vladimir Negovsky in Moscow during Dr Hosler’s visit to Russia. Courtesy of the Dittrick Medical History Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Bloc Réanimateur, the first automatic external defibrillator/pacer designed by Fred Zacouto, MD. Courtesy of Fred Zacouto, MD.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Bernard Lown, MD. Courtesy of Lown Cardiovascular Research Foundation.
Figure 8
Figure 8
Barouh V. Berkovits. Courtesy of the Heart Rhythm Foundation.
Figure 9
Figure 9
Drs Morton Mower (left) and Michel Mirowski (right) with their first prototype of an automatic defibrillator. Courtesy of Ariella Rosengard, MD.

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