Hyperandrogenaemia in Adolescent Girls: Origins of Abnormal Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Secretion

BJOG. 2010 Jan;117(2):143-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2009.02383.x.

Abstract

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common disorder characterized by ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenemia (HA). Its origins begin peripubertally, as adolescent HA commonly leads to adult HA and decreased fertility. HA reduces inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone pulse frequency by progesterone, causing rapid LH pulse secretion and further increasing ovarian androgen production. Obese girls are at risk for HA and develop increased LH pulse frequency with elevated mean LH by late puberty. Many girls with HA do not exhibit normal LH pulse sensitivity to progesterone inhibition. Thus, HA may adversely affect LH pulse regulation during pubertal maturation leading to persistent HA.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Circadian Rhythm
  • Estradiol / metabolism
  • Female
  • Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / metabolism*
  • Humans
  • Hyperandrogenism / complications
  • Hyperandrogenism / metabolism*
  • Infant
  • Luteinizing Hormone / metabolism
  • Menstrual Cycle / metabolism*
  • Metabolic Syndrome / complications
  • Obesity / complications
  • Obesity / metabolism
  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome / complications
  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome / metabolism*
  • Progesterone / physiology
  • Puberty / metabolism*
  • Puberty / physiology
  • Testosterone / metabolism

Substances

  • Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
  • Testosterone
  • Progesterone
  • Estradiol
  • Luteinizing Hormone