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, 47 Suppl 1, S34-8

Disease Pathogenesis Explained by Basic Science: Lysosomal Storage Diseases as Autophagocytic Disorders

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Disease Pathogenesis Explained by Basic Science: Lysosomal Storage Diseases as Autophagocytic Disorders

A Ballabio. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther.

Abstract

Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are characterized by intra-lysosomal accumulation of undegraded metabolites due to the defective activity of lysosomal enzymes. There is a paucity of data, however, relating to the mechanisms that link this accumulation with disease pathology. Several LSDs can be attributed to deficiencies in the activity of sulfatase enzymes. The gene responsible for the post-translational modification that activates sulfatases, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1), is defective in the rare autosomal recessive disorder multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD). A mouse model of MSD (Sumf1 knockout mouse) exhibits a similar phenotype to patients with MSD, with marked lysosomal storage of undegraded metabolites, and increased expression of inflammatory markers and apoptotic markers. Investigation of disease pathology in mouse models of two LSDs (MSD and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) Type IIIA) has revealed an increased number of autophagosomes in these animals compared with wild-type mice. This appears to result from impaired autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may in turn lead to an absence of autophagy. The suggestion that LSDs can be defined as disorders of autophagy implies that there may be some overlap between pathological mechanisms of LSDs and more common neurodegenerative diseases, and this may help provide direction for future therapeutic strategies.

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