Elderly hispanics more likely to reside in poor-quality nursing homes

Health Aff (Millwood). Jan-Feb 2010;29(1):65-73. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2009.0003.

Abstract

The proportion of Hispanics age sixty-five and older who are living in nursing homes rose from 5 percent in 2000 to 6.4 percent in 2005. Although segregation in nursing homes seems to have declined slightly, elderly Hispanics are more likely than their non-Hispanic white peers to reside in nursing homes that are characterized by severe deficiencies in performance, understaffing, and poor care.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Disabled Persons / statistics & numerical data
  • Health Services Accessibility / economics
  • Health Services Accessibility / statistics & numerical data
  • Health Services for the Aged / economics
  • Health Services for the Aged / standards*
  • Health Services for the Aged / statistics & numerical data
  • Health Status Indicators
  • Healthcare Disparities / ethnology
  • Healthcare Disparities / standards*
  • Hispanic Americans / statistics & numerical data*
  • Humans
  • Insurance Coverage / statistics & numerical data
  • Long-Term Care / standards
  • Long-Term Care / statistics & numerical data*
  • Medicaid / standards
  • Medicaid / statistics & numerical data
  • Nursing Homes / standards*
  • Nursing Homes / statistics & numerical data
  • Nursing Homes / trends
  • Personnel Staffing and Scheduling / standards
  • Personnel Staffing and Scheduling / statistics & numerical data
  • Prejudice
  • Quality Improvement / standards*
  • United States
  • Urban Population / statistics & numerical data