Predictors of change in grip strength over 3 years in the African American health project

J Aging Health. 2010 Mar;22(2):183-96. doi: 10.1177/0898264309355816. Epub 2010 Jan 5.

Abstract

Objective: To examine factors associated with change in grip strength.

Method: Grip strength was measured at baseline and 3 years later. Change was divided into "decreased >/=5 kg," "increased >/=5 kg," and "no change" and analyzed using multinomial multivariable logistic regression.

Results: Decline in grip strength was more likely for men, those reporting having cardiovascular disease, and those with instrumental activities of daily living, lower body functional limitations, high diastolic blood pressure, higher physical activity, and greater body mass. Decline was less likely among those ever having Medicaid, those with basic activities of daily living disabilities, and those unable to see a doctor in past year due to cost. Gain in grip strength was more likely for men and those with instrumental activities of daily living disabilities, lower body functional limitations, high diastolic blood pressure, and higher physical activity; it was less likely for older participants.

Discussion: Results can be used to design interventions to improve strength outcomes.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Activities of Daily Living
  • African Americans / statistics & numerical data*
  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Aging / physiology*
  • Body Mass Index
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / pathology
  • Confidence Intervals
  • Disabled Persons
  • Female
  • Hand Strength / physiology*
  • Health Status Indicators
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Motor Activity
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Muscle Strength / physiology*
  • Odds Ratio
  • Psychometrics
  • Reference Values
  • Sarcopenia / pathology
  • Sex Factors
  • Time Factors
  • United States