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Review
. 2010 Jul;34(8):1178-94.
doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.01.009. Epub 2010 Jan 28.

Reliable Differences in Brain Activity Between Young and Old Adults: A Quantitative Meta-Analysis Across Multiple Cognitive Domains

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Review

Reliable Differences in Brain Activity Between Young and Old Adults: A Quantitative Meta-Analysis Across Multiple Cognitive Domains

R Nathan Spreng et al. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. .

Abstract

We conducted a systematic review of the neuroimaging literature examining cognition in old and young adults and quantified these findings in a series of meta-analyses using the activation likelihood estimation technique. In 80 independent samples, we assessed significant convergent and divergent patterns of brain activity across all studies; where task performance was equated or different between age groups; and in four specific cognitive domains (perception, memory encoding, memory retrieval and executive function). Age differences across studies predominantly involved regions within the 'task-positive network' of the brain, a set of interconnected regions engaged during a variety of externally driven cognitive tasks. Old adults engaged prefrontal regions more than young adults. When performance was equivalent, old adults engaged left prefrontal cortex; poorly performing old adults engaged right prefrontal cortex. Young adults engaged occipital regions more than old adults, particularly when performance was unequal and during perceptual tasks. No age-related differences were found in the parietal lobes. We discuss the reliable differences in brain activation with regards to current theories of neurocognitive aging.

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