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Dichlorvos Exposure Impedes Extraction and Amplification of DNA From Insects in Museum Collections

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Dichlorvos Exposure Impedes Extraction and Amplification of DNA From Insects in Museum Collections

Marianne Espeland et al. Front Zool.

Abstract

Background: The insecticides dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene have been commonly used to eradicate pest insects from natural history collections. However, it is not known how these chemicals affect the DNA of the specimens in the collections. We thus tested the effect of dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene on DNA of insects (Musca domestica) by extracting and amplifying DNA from specimens exposed to insecticides in two different concentrations over increasing time intervals.

Results: The results clearly show that dichlorvos impedes both extraction and amplification of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA after relatively short time, whereas paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene do not.

Conclusion: Collections treated with paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene, are better preserved concerning DNA, than those treated with dichlorvos. Non toxic pest control methods should, however, be preferred due to physical damage of specimens and putative health risks by chemicals.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Dichlorvos (arrow) as used in insect drawers at the Swedish Museum of Natural History.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Total DNA extracts of dichlorvos exposed specimens. A) High concentration (0.02 g/vial). B) Low concentration (0.001 g/vial). L indicates ladder. See Table 2 for sample intervals.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Total DNA extracts of specimens exposed to high concentration (0.02 g/vial) A) paradichlorobenzene and B) naphthalene, and C) controls not exposed to insecticides. L indicates ladder. See Table 2 for sample intervals.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Amplification of a 717 bp fragment of the nuclear gene EF1a. A-I) High concentration dichlorvos, A-II) High concentration paradichlorobenzene, B-I) High concentration naphthalene, B-II) Control, C-I) Low concentration dichlorvos, C-II) Low concentration paradichlorobenzene, D-I) low concentration naphthalene, D-II) Control. See Table 2 for sample intervals.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Amplification of a 658 bp fragment of the mitochondrial gene COI. A-I) High concentration dichlorvos, A-II) High concentration paradichlorobenzene, B-I) High concentration naphthalene, B-II) Control, C-I) Low concentration dichlorvos, C-II) Low concentration paradichlorobenzene, D-I) low concentration naphthalene, D-II) Control. See Table 2 for sample intervals.

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