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, 12 (2), 212-25

Co-transplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Glia and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Does Not Have Synergistic Effects After Spinal Cord Injury in the Rat

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Co-transplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Glia and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Does Not Have Synergistic Effects After Spinal Cord Injury in the Rat

Takashi Amemori et al. Cytotherapy.

Abstract

Background aims: Olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are suitable candidates for transplantation therapy of spinal cord injury (SCI). Both facilitate functional improvement after SCI by producing trophic factors and cytokines. In this study, the co-transplantation of both types of cells was studied to clarify their additive and/ or synergistic effects on SCI.

Methods: A balloon-induced compression lesion was used to produce SCI in rats. OEG, MSC or both OEG and MSC (3 x 10(5) cells of each cell type) were implanted by intraspinal injection 1 week after SCI. The effect of transplantation was assessed using behavioral, electrophysiologic and histologic methods.

Results: Hindlimb function was examined with Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) and Plantar tests. Improvement was found in all three groups of transplanted rats with different time-courses, but there was no significant difference among the groups at the end of the experiment. Motor-evoked potentials after SCI decreased in amplitude from 7 mV to 10 microV. Linear regression analysis showed a modest recovery in amplitude following transplantation, but no change in the control rats. Histologic findings showed that the white and gray matter were significantly spared by transplantation after SCI.

Conclusions: Functional improvement was achieved with transplantation of OEG and/or MSC, but the co-transplantation of OEG and MSC did not show synergistic effects. The poor migration of OEG and MSC might prevent their concerted action. Pre-treatment with a Rho antagonist and a combination of intraspinal and intravenous injection of the cells might be beneficial for SCI therapy.

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