Prevalence and etiology of nosocomial diarrhoea in children < 5 years in Tikrit teaching hospital

East Mediterr Health J. Sep-Oct 2009;15(5):1111-8.

Abstract

A cross-sectional hospital-based study was carried out at Tikrit teaching hospital, Iraq, from October 2004 to September 2005, to identify the prevalence and etiology of nosocomial infectious diarrhoea among children under 5 years of age. Of 259 children admitted to the paediatric ward for reasons other than diarrhoea and hospitalized for more than 3 days, clinical and laboratory analysis of stool samples showed nosocomial diarrhoea in 84 children (32.4%). The most common causative agents were enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (25.9%), Clostridium difficile (21.0%) and rotavirus (18.5%). Single infectious agents caused 63.1% of the cases, while mixed infections were detected in 16.7%; in 20.2% of children the cause remained unknown.

MeSH terms

  • Age Distribution
  • Causality
  • Child, Preschool
  • Clostridium Infections / complications*
  • Clostridium difficile
  • Cross Infection* / epidemiology
  • Cross Infection* / etiology
  • Cross Infection* / microbiology
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Diarrhea* / epidemiology
  • Diarrhea* / microbiology
  • Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli
  • Escherichia coli Infections / complications*
  • Female
  • Hospitals, Teaching*
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infection Control
  • Iraq / epidemiology
  • Length of Stay / statistics & numerical data
  • Male
  • Prevalence
  • Rotavirus Infections / complications*
  • Sex Distribution