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Randomized Controlled Trial
. 2010 Apr 29;362(17):1575-85.
doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1001286. Epub 2010 Mar 14.

Effects of Intensive Blood-Pressure Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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Free PMC article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Effects of Intensive Blood-Pressure Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

ACCORD Study Group et al. N Engl J Med. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: There is no evidence from randomized trials to support a strategy of lowering systolic blood pressure below 135 to 140 mm Hg in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We investigated whether therapy targeting normal systolic pressure (i.e., <120 mm Hg) reduces major cardiovascular events in participants with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular events.

Methods: A total of 4733 participants with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to intensive therapy, targeting a systolic pressure of less than 120 mm Hg, or standard therapy, targeting a systolic pressure of less than 140 mm Hg. The primary composite outcome was nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes. The mean follow-up was 4.7 years.

Results: After 1 year, the mean systolic blood pressure was 119.3 mm Hg in the intensive-therapy group and 133.5 mm Hg in the standard-therapy group. The annual rate of the primary outcome was 1.87% in the intensive-therapy group and 2.09% in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio with intensive therapy, 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 1.06; P=0.20). The annual rates of death from any cause were 1.28% and 1.19% in the two groups, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.35; P=0.55). The annual rates of stroke, a prespecified secondary outcome, were 0.32% and 0.53% in the two groups, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.89; P=0.01). Serious adverse events attributed to antihypertensive treatment occurred in 77 of the 2362 participants in the intensive-therapy group (3.3%) and 30 of the 2371 participants in the standard-therapy group (1.3%) (P<0.001).

Conclusions: In patients with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular events, targeting a systolic blood pressure of less than 120 mm Hg, as compared with less than 140 mm Hg, did not reduce the rate of a composite outcome of fatal and nonfatal major cardiovascular events. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00000620.)

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Mean Systolic Blood-Pressure Levels at Each Study Visit
I bars indicate 95% confidence intervals.
Figure 2
Figure 2. Kaplan-Meier Analyses of Selected Outcomes
Shown are the proportions of patients with events for the primary composite outcome (Panel A) and for the individual components of the primary outcome (Panels B, C, and D). The insets show close-up versions of the graphs in each panel.

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