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. 2010 Dec;122(6):398-403.
doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01325.x.

Sleep Habits and Sleep Complaints in Austria: Current Self-Reported Data on Sleep Behaviour, Sleep Disturbances and Their Treatment

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Sleep Habits and Sleep Complaints in Austria: Current Self-Reported Data on Sleep Behaviour, Sleep Disturbances and Their Treatment

Josef Zeitlhofer et al. Acta Neurol Scand. .

Abstract

Objectives: To acquire current information on sleep habits, disturbances and treatment options in the adult population of Austria and compare results with previously collected data.

Materials and methods: A representative sample of the Austrian population (women: n = 522, men: n = 478).

Results: Seventy-five percent reported daily sleep-duration between 6 and 8 h. In 76%, sleep latency was <30 min, 15% described difficulties in sleep maintenance. Longer sleep on weekends was prevalent in 54%, 23% took a nap. Concerning sleep environment, 31% reported sleeping alone; the rest had a constant or occasional bed partner. Sleep disturbances such as sleep disruption or prolonged sleep latency were reported by 18%. Predominant symptoms included snoring/apneas (22%), nightmares (22%) and restless legs (21%). Daytime tiredness was reported by 17% and sleepiness by 20%. Twenty-four percent did not take treatment. Only 7% asked for medical help: 96% consulted their physician; 47% tried to change their way of living. Sleep promoting drugs were taken by 7%. Sleep improving measures were: sleep promoters (45%), general measures (20%), consultation of general practitioner (20%), psychotherapy (6%), and technical tools (3%). Comparison with a dataset of 1993 revealed only a slight increase in short sleepers and a slight decrease in long sleepers.

Conclusions: Subjectively reported sleep disorders proved to be relatively stable between 1993 and 2007.

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