Role of leptin in the activation of immune cells

Mediators Inflamm. 2010;2010:568343. doi: 10.1155/2010/568343. Epub 2010 Mar 23.

Abstract

Adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ that secretes various humoral factors (adipokines), and its shift to production of proinflammatory cytokines in obesity likely contributes to the low-level systemic inflammation that may be present in metabolic syndrome-associated chronic pathologies such as atherosclerosis. Leptin is one of the most important hormones secreted by adipocytes, with a variety of physiological roles related to the control of metabolism and energy homeostasis. One of these functions is the connection between nutritional status and immune competence. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin has been shown to regulate the immune response, innate and adaptive response, both in normal and pathological conditions. The role of leptin in regulating immune response has been assessed in vitro as well as in clinical studies. It has been shown that conditions of reduced leptin production are associated with increased infection susceptibility. Conversely, immune-mediated disorders such as autoimmune diseases are associated with increased secretion of leptin and production of proinflammatory pathogenic cytokines. Thus, leptin is a mediator of the inflammatory response.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Adaptive Immunity / immunology*
  • Adipokines / immunology
  • Adipose Tissue / cytology
  • Adipose Tissue / immunology*
  • Animals
  • Humans
  • Immunity, Innate / immunology*
  • Inflammation / immunology*
  • Leptin / metabolism*
  • Lymphocyte Activation
  • Obesity / immunology

Substances

  • Adipokines
  • Leptin