Changing patient characteristics in chronic hemodialysis

Scand J Urol Nephrol. 1991;25(1):59-63. doi: 10.3109/00365599109024530.

Abstract

Patients accepted to chronic hemodialysis have changed. We analyzed these changes and survival, cause of death and other factors during 23 years at the Karolinska Hospital. Between 1965 and 1987, 274 patients were accepted: 60 are alive on dialysis, 75 died, 113 were transplanted, 25 sent to other units and one recovered renal function. The mean age increased from 44 to 55 years (p=0.001), the creatinine level at acceptance decreased from 1191 to 965 mumol/l (p = 0.001), the hemoglobin level rose from 70 to 85 g/l (p = 0.001) and the diastolic blood pressure decreased from 96 to 90 mmHg (p = 0.007). The number of co-morbid conditions increased from 1.2 to 1.4 (p less than 0.005). The diagnoses changed from over 90% primary renal disease to 20% systemic diseases such as nephrosclerosis and diabetes (p = 0.04). The chance of receiving a renal transplant decreased from 46 to 39% (p = 0.28). The transplanted patients were younger than the dialyzed patients 42 vs 47 years (p = 0.03) before 1980 and 49 vs. 56 years (p = 0.0001) after 1980. The cause of death changed. Withdrawal from dialysis increased from 5% of deaths before to 24% after 1980 (p = 0.047), cardiovascular deaths decreased from 85% to 55% (p = 0.01). Although the patients accepted for dialysis after 1980 had more serious renal disease and other degenerative diseases than those before, the mortality rate was reduced to only 1/4 to that before, in all age groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Cause of Death
  • Comorbidity
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Kidney Failure, Chronic / mortality
  • Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy*
  • Kidney Function Tests
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Referral and Consultation / trends*
  • Renal Dialysis / mortality
  • Renal Dialysis / trends*
  • Survival Rate
  • Sweden