Haemolytic anaemia after childhood Escherichia coli O 157 .H7 infection: are females at increased risk?

Epidemiol Infect. 1991 Jun;106(3):523-30. doi: 10.1017/s0950268800067583.

Abstract

We conducted a 4-year retrospective cohort study to better define the risk of haemolytic anaemia and haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) in children following sporadic gastrointestinal infection with the O 157.H7 serotype of Escherichia coli. Of the 72 children infected with this organism, 9 (12.5%) developed haemolytic anaemia, 6 of whom had HUS. No child in a cohort of 72 age-matched controls with Campylobacter jejuni gastroenteritis developed haemolytic anaemia (P = 0.003). Females had a significantly greater risk of developing haemolytic anaemia after E. coli O 157. H7 infection than did males (8/29 females v. 1/43 males; P = 0.003). In a logistic regression model, female gender emerged as the only statistically significant risk factor for haemolytic anaemia (odds ratio 3.85; 95% confidence interval 1.24-12). These results are consistent with recent reports of a moderate increase in the risk of HUS for females.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Age Factors
  • Anemia, Hemolytic / etiology*
  • Bacterial Toxins / genetics
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cohort Studies
  • Enterotoxins / genetics
  • Escherichia coli / classification
  • Escherichia coli / genetics
  • Escherichia coli / isolation & purification
  • Escherichia coli Infections / complications*
  • Feces / microbiology
  • Female
  • Gastroenteritis / complications*
  • Hemoglobins / analysis
  • Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome / etiology*
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Male
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Seasons
  • Sex Factors
  • Shiga Toxin 1

Substances

  • Bacterial Toxins
  • Enterotoxins
  • Hemoglobins
  • Shiga Toxin 1