Parenteral insulin suppresses T cell proliferation to islet antigens

Pediatr Diabetes. 2011 May;12(3 Pt 1):150-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-5448.2010.00674.x.

Abstract

The diabetes prevention trial-type 1 (DPT-1) tested whether a combination of SQ and IV insulin therapy would delay the onset of disease in individuals at high risk of progression. We investigated whether this regimen altered T cell responses to human islet proteins using cellular immunoblotting. Among the 10 treated and 7 control subjects studied, we found that there was a significant effect of treatment on cellular immunoblotting responses. We conclude that parenteral insulin may suppress proliferation to islet antigens in individuals at risk for diabetes, but this effect may be transient. Further study is needed to determine whether a therapy that results in sustained suppression of T cell proliferation could yield a measurable clinical benefit.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Autoantibodies / blood
  • Autoantibodies / immunology
  • Cell Division / drug effects
  • Cell Division / immunology
  • Child
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / drug therapy*
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / epidemiology
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / prevention & control*
  • Disease Progression
  • Humans
  • Hypoglycemic Agents / administration & dosage*
  • Hypoglycemic Agents / immunology
  • Injections, Intravenous
  • Injections, Subcutaneous
  • Insulin / administration & dosage*
  • Insulin / immunology
  • Islets of Langerhans / immunology
  • Parents
  • Risk Factors
  • T-Lymphocytes / cytology
  • T-Lymphocytes / drug effects*
  • T-Lymphocytes / immunology
  • Young Adult

Substances

  • Autoantibodies
  • Hypoglycemic Agents
  • Insulin