The Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes Is Increased in Preeclamptic Women Who Smoke Compared With Nonpreeclamptic Women Who Do Not Smoke

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Oct;203(4):334.e1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.05.020. Epub 2010 Jun 26.

Abstract

Objective: Maternal smoking and preeclampsia independently increase the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes; however, smoking decreases the risk of preeclampsia. We sought to estimate the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes among preeclamptic women who smoke and hypothesized that this risk would be increased, compared with nonpreeclamptic women who smoke or preeclamptic women who do not smoke.

Study design: With the use of the Niday Perinatal Database and multiple logistic regressions, we estimated the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in nonpreeclamptic women who smoke, preeclamptic women who do not smoke, and preeclamptic women who smoke in relation to nonpreeclamptic women who do not smoke.

Results: The incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes was more than twice as high among preeclamptic women who smoke as among nonpreeclamptic women who do not smoke. The following data were observed: small-for-gestational-age infant (odds ratio [OR], 3.40; 95% CI, 2.27-4.89), preterm birth (OR, 5.77; 95% CI, 4.50-7.35), very preterm birth (OR, 5.44; 95% CI, 3.51-8.11), abruption (OR, 6.16; 95% CI, 3.05-11.01), Apgar <4 at 5 minutes (OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.48-5.72), and stillbirth (OR, 3.39; 95% CI, 1.33-6.99).

Conclusion: Smoking decreases the risk of preeclampsia, but smokers with preeclampsia have an increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Abruptio Placentae / epidemiology
  • Adult
  • Apgar Score
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Small for Gestational Age
  • Ontario / epidemiology
  • Pre-Eclampsia / epidemiology*
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Outcome*
  • Premature Birth / epidemiology
  • Risk
  • Smoking / adverse effects*
  • Smoking / epidemiology
  • Stillbirth / epidemiology