Nonpharmacological treatment of tics in Tourette syndrome adding videotape training to self-hypnosis

J Dev Behav Pediatr. Jul-Aug 2010;31(6):498-504. doi: 10.1097/DBP.0b013e3181e56c5d.

Abstract

Objective: This case series examines the practicality of using a standardized method of training children in self-hypnosis (SH) methods to explore its efficiency and short-term efficacy in treating tics in patients with Tourette syndrome.

Methods: The files of 37 children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome referred for SH training were reviewed, yielding 33 patients for analysis. As part of a protocol for SH training, all viewed a videotape series of a boy undergoing SH training for tic control. Improvement in tic control was abstracted from subjective patient report.

Results: Seventy-nine percent of the patients trained in this technique experienced short-term clinical response, defined as control over the average 6-week follow-up period. Of the responders, 46% achieved tic control with SH after only 2 sessions and 96% after 3 visits. One patient required 4 visits.

Conclusions: Instruction in SH, aided by the use of videotape training, augments a protocol and probably shortens the time of training in this technique. If SH is made more accessible in this way, it will be a valuable addition to multi-disciplinary management of tic disorders in Tourette syndrome.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Autogenic Training / methods*
  • Child
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Hypnosis / methods*
  • Male
  • Self Care / methods*
  • Suggestion
  • Tourette Syndrome / psychology
  • Tourette Syndrome / therapy*
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Videotape Recording*