Nutrition and Aging Skin: Sugar and Glycation

Clin Dermatol. Jul-Aug 2010;28(4):409-11. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2010.03.018.

Abstract

The effect of sugars on aging skin is governed by the simple act of covalently cross-linking two collagen fibers, which renders both of them incapable of easy repair. Glucose and fructose link the amino acids present in the collagen and elastin that support the dermis, producing advanced glycation end products or "AGEs." This process is accelerated in all body tissues when sugar is elevated and is further stimulated by ultraviolet light in the skin. The effect on vascular, renal, retinal, coronary, and cutaneous tissues is being defined, as are methods of reducing the glycation load through careful diet and use of supplements.

MeSH terms

  • Collagen / metabolism
  • Dietary Sucrose / pharmacology*
  • Elastin / metabolism
  • Fructose / pharmacology
  • Glucose / pharmacology
  • Glycation End Products, Advanced / metabolism*
  • Humans
  • Nutritional Physiological Phenomena / physiology*
  • Skin / drug effects*
  • Skin / metabolism
  • Skin Aging / physiology*

Substances

  • Dietary Sucrose
  • Glycation End Products, Advanced
  • Fructose
  • Collagen
  • Elastin
  • Glucose