The well-being and treatment satisfaction of diabetic patients in primary care

Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2010 Jul 13;8:67. doi: 10.1186/1477-7525-8-67.

Abstract

Background: The quality of life in patients with diabetes is reduced and emotional coping with the disease has great impact on patient well-being.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the psychological well-being and treatment satisfaction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care.

Study design and setting: Patients (n = 112) with type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosis for at least six months were enrolled. The Well-Being Questionnaire-22 and the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire were used. Physical examination and laboratory investigations were performed.

Results: The rates of the achieved targets were 32.1% for hemoglobin A1c, 62.5% for cholesterol and 20.5% for blood pressure. The mean scores for the general well-being, depression, anxiety, positive well-being and energy were 44.40 +/- 13.23 (range = 16-62), 12.65 +/- 3.80 (range = 5-18), 10.57 +/- 4.47 (range = 1-18), 12.00 +/- 4.01 (range = 2-18), and 9.16 +/- 2.47 (range = 2-12), respectively. The mean scores for the treatment satisfaction, perception for hyperglycemia and perception for hypoglycemia were 22.37 +/- 9.53 (range = 0.00-36.00), 1.71 +/- 1.59 (range = 0-6), and 0.51 +/- 0.98 (range = 0-6), respectively. There were significant associations between the depression score and the educational status, compliance to diet and physical exercise, and diabetic complications; between the anxiety score and the educational status, glycemic control, compliance to diet and physical exercise; between the energy score and the educational status, compliance to physical exercise, and diabetic complications; between the positive well-being score and the educational status, compliance to diet and physical exercise, complications and type of treatment; between the general well-being score and the educational status, compliance for diet and physical exercise, and complications. Treatment satisfaction was significantly associated to the educational status, glycemic control and compliance to diet and physical exercise. A significant correlation was found between the treatment satisfaction and the well-being.

Conclusions: Individualized care of patients with diabetes should consider improving the quality of life. Psychosocial support should be provided to the patients with type 2 diabetes and the negative effects of psychopathological conditions on the metabolic control should be lessened.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / psychology
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / therapy*
  • Educational Status
  • Female
  • Health Status Indicators
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Patient Satisfaction*
  • Primary Health Care
  • Quality of Life*
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Treatment Outcome