Sustained body weight reduction by an individual-based lifestyle intervention for workers in the construction industry at risk for cardiovascular disease: results of a randomized controlled trial

Prev Med. Sep-Oct 2010;51(3-4):240-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2010.07.021. Epub 2010 Aug 6.

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention for male workers in the construction industry at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Methods: In a randomized controlled trial performed in the Netherlands between 2007 and 2009, usual care was compared to 6 months of individual counseling using motivational interviewing techniques, delivered face to face and by telephone. Participants aimed at improving energy balance-related behavior or smoking cessation. Linear regression analyses were performed to determine the effects.

Results: Body weight had significantly decreased at 6 (β=-1.9, 95% CI -2.6; -1.2) and 12 months (β=-1.8, 95%CI -2.8; -1.1). The intervention effects were also significant for diastolic blood pressure at 6 months (β=-1.7, 95% CI -3.3; -0.1). Among participants who had aimed at energy balance, the intervention had a significant favorable effect on body weight at 6 (β=-2.1, 95% CI -2.9; -1.3) and 12 months (β=-2.2, 95% CI -3.1; -1.3) and at HDL cholesterol (β=0.05, 95% CI 0.01; 0.10) and HbA1c (β=-0.06, 95%CI -0.12; -0.001) at 12 months, although there was no intervention effect on these variables over time.

Conclusion: Individual-based counseling resulted in significant beneficial long-term effects on body weight. This is an important finding for occupational health, considering the rising prevalence of obesity and CVD.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Blood Pressure
  • Body Weight
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / prevention & control
  • Cholesterol / blood
  • Cholesterol, HDL / blood
  • Directive Counseling / methods
  • Glycated Hemoglobin A / analysis
  • Health Promotion / methods*
  • Humans
  • Industry
  • Linear Models
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Motivation
  • Risk Factors
  • Risk Reduction Behavior*
  • Weight Loss*
  • Young Adult

Substances

  • Cholesterol, HDL
  • Glycated Hemoglobin A
  • hemoglobin A1c protein, human
  • Cholesterol