Exercise therapy correlates with improving renal function through modifying lipid metabolism in patients with cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease

J Cardiol. 2010 Sep;56(2):142-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jjcc.2010.06.007. Epub 2010 Aug 8.

Abstract

Background: Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk of cardiovascular mortality, thus therapies to improve renal function should be clinically investigated.

Methods and results: We divided consecutive patients with CVD and CKD (n=19) into exercise (n=10) and non-exercise (n=9) therapy groups. Exercise therapy for 12 weeks significantly improved the anaerobic metabolic threshold (AT-V O₂) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, and reduced triglyceride levels. Exercise therapy also improved estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Change in eGFR correlated significantly and positively with change in AT-V O₂ and HDL-C, and negatively with change in triglyceride levels.

Conclusions: Exercise therapy correlates with improving renal function in CVD patients with CKD through modifying lipid metabolism. Exercise therapy could be an effective clinical strategy to improve renal function.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / physiopathology
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / therapy*
  • Cholesterol, HDL / blood
  • Exercise Therapy*
  • Female
  • Glomerular Filtration Rate
  • Humans
  • Kidney / physiology*
  • Kidney Failure, Chronic / physiopathology
  • Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy*
  • Lipid Metabolism / physiology*
  • Male
  • Triglycerides / blood

Substances

  • Cholesterol, HDL
  • Triglycerides