Implications of climate change for agricultural productivity in the early twenty-first century

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2010 Sep 27;365(1554):2973-89. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2010.0158.

Abstract

This paper reviews recent literature concerning a wide range of processes through which climate change could potentially impact global-scale agricultural productivity, and presents projections of changes in relevant meteorological, hydrological and plant physiological quantities from a climate model ensemble to illustrate key areas of uncertainty. Few global-scale assessments have been carried out, and these are limited in their ability to capture the uncertainty in climate projections, and omit potentially important aspects such as extreme events and changes in pests and diseases. There is a lack of clarity on how climate change impacts on drought are best quantified from an agricultural perspective, with different metrics giving very different impressions of future risk. The dependence of some regional agriculture on remote rainfall, snowmelt and glaciers adds to the complexity. Indirect impacts via sea-level rise, storms and diseases have not been quantified. Perhaps most seriously, there is high uncertainty in the extent to which the direct effects of CO(2) rise on plant physiology will interact with climate change in affecting productivity. At present, the aggregate impacts of climate change on global-scale agricultural productivity cannot be reliably quantified.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Agriculture / methods*
  • Agriculture / trends
  • Climate Change*
  • Models, Theoretical
  • Plant Development*
  • Water Supply