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Randomized Controlled Trial
. 2010 Oct;11(9):934-40.
doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2010.04.014. Epub 2010 Sep 1.

Aerobic Exercise Improves Self-Reported Sleep and Quality of Life in Older Adults With Insomnia

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Free PMC article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Aerobic Exercise Improves Self-Reported Sleep and Quality of Life in Older Adults With Insomnia

Kathryn J Reid et al. Sleep Med. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Objective: To assess the efficacy of moderate aerobic physical activity with sleep hygiene education to improve sleep, mood and quality of life in older adults with chronic insomnia.

Methods: Seventeen sedentary adults aged >or=55 years with insomnia (mean age 61.6 [SD±4.3] years; 16 female) participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing 16 weeks of aerobic physical activity plus sleep hygiene to non-physical activity plus sleep hygiene. Eligibility included primary insomnia for at least 3 months, habitual sleep duration <6.5h and a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score >5. Outcomes included sleep quality, mood and quality of life questionnaires (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS], Short-form 36 [SF-36], Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale [CES-D]).

Results: The physical activity group improved in sleep quality on the global PSQI (p<.0001), sleep latency (p=.049), sleep duration (p=.04), daytime dysfunction (p=.027), and sleep efficiency (p=.036) PSQI sub-scores compared to the control group. The physical activity group also had reductions in depressive symptoms (p=.044), daytime sleepiness (p=.02) and improvements in vitality (p=.017) compared to baseline scores.

Conclusion: Aerobic physical activity with sleep hygiene education is an effective treatment approach to improve sleep quality, mood and quality of life in older adults with chronic insomnia.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Mean and standard deviation for subjective sleep quality (PSQI), depressive symptom (CES-D) and daytime sleepiness (ESS) for the exercise and Non-Physical Activity groups. Post hoc analysis indicates * p<0.0001, # p=0.044, + p=0.02

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