Long-term impact of prevention programs to promote effective parenting: lasting effects but uncertain processes

Annu Rev Psychol. 2011;62:299-329. doi: 10.1146/annurev.psych.121208.131619.

Abstract

This article reviews findings from 46 randomized experimental trials of preventive parenting interventions. The findings of these trials provide evidence of effects to prevent a wide range of problem outcomes and to promote competencies from one to 20 years later. However, there is a paucity of evidence concerning the processes that account for program effects. Three alternative pathways are proposed as a framework for future research on the long-term effects of preventive parenting programs: (a) through program effects on parenting skills, perceptions of parental efficacy, and reduction in barriers to effective parenting; (b) through program-induced reductions in short-term problems of youth that persist over time, improvements in youth adaptation to stress, and improvements in youth belief systems concerning the self and their relationships with others; and (c) through effects on contexts in which youth become involved and on youth-environment transactions.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Humans
  • Parenting / psychology*
  • Parents / psychology*
  • Program Evaluation*
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
  • Time