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, 14 (7), 1191-202

Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Provides Cardioprotection During Ischemia/Reperfusion by Reducing Oxidative Stress

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Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Provides Cardioprotection During Ischemia/Reperfusion by Reducing Oxidative Stress

Kiyokazu Koga et al. Antioxid Redox Signal.

Abstract

Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multifunctional protein that exhibits an intrinsic thiol protein oxidoreductase activity and proinflammatory activities. In the present study to examine intracellular MIF redox function, exposure of MIF-deficient cardiac fibroblasts to oxidizing conditions resulted in a 2.3-fold increase (p < 0.001) in intracellular ROS that could be significantly reduced by adenoviral-mediated reexpression of recombinant MIF. In an animal model of myocardial injury by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), MIF-deficient hearts exhibited higher levels of oxidative stress than did wild-type hearts, as measured by significantly higher oxidized glutathione levels (decreased GSH/GSSG ratio), increased protein oxidation, reduced aconitase activity, and increased mitochondrial injury (increased cytochrome c release). The increased myocardial oxidative stress after I/R was reflected by larger infarct size (INF) in MIF-deficient hearts versus wild-type (WT) hearts (21 ± 6% vs. 8 ± 3% INF/LV; p < 0.05). In vivo hemodynamic measurements showed that left ventricular (LV) contractile function of MIF-deficient hearts subjected to 15-min ischemia failed to recover during reperfusion compared with WT hearts (LV developed pressure and ± dP/dt; p = 0.02). These data represent the first in vivo evidence in support of a cardioprotective role of MIF in the postischemic heart by reducing oxidative stress.

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