Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2010 Oct 8;401(1):64-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2010.09.009. Epub 2010 Sep 15.

Abstract

The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H₂O₂ generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Aging / metabolism*
  • Animals
  • Catalysis
  • Drosophila melanogaster / enzymology
  • Drosophila melanogaster / physiology*
  • Electron Transport Complex IV / chemistry
  • Electron Transport Complex IV / metabolism*
  • Protein Subunits / chemistry
  • Protein Subunits / metabolism

Substances

  • Protein Subunits
  • Electron Transport Complex IV