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Review
, 2010

The Employment of Leukotriene Antagonists in Cutaneous Diseases Belonging to Allergological Field

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Review

The Employment of Leukotriene Antagonists in Cutaneous Diseases Belonging to Allergological Field

Eustachio Nettis et al. Mediators Inflamm.

Abstract

Leukotrienes (LTs) are potent biological proinflammatory mediators. LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 are more frequently involved in chronic inflammatory responses and exert their actions binding to a cysteinyl-LT 1 (CysLT1) receptor and a cysteinyl-LT 2 (CysLT2) receptor. LTs receptor antagonists available for clinical use demonstrate high-affinity binding to the CysLT1 receptor. In this paper the employment of anti-LTs in allergic cutaneous diseases is analyzed showing that several studies have recently reported a beneficial effects of these agents (montelukast and zafirlukast as well as zileuton) for the treatment of some allergic cutaneous related diseases-like chronic urticaria and atopic eczema although their proper application remains to be established.

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