Assessing nonresponse bias at follow-up in a large prospective cohort of relatively young and mobile military service members

BMC Med Res Methodol. 2010 Oct 21;10:99. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-10-99.

Abstract

Background: Nonresponse bias in a longitudinal study could affect the magnitude and direction of measures of association. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, military, and health-related predictors of response to the first follow-up questionnaire in a large military cohort and assessed the extent to which nonresponse biased measures of association.

Methods: Data are from the baseline and first follow-up survey of the Millennium Cohort Study. Seventy-six thousand, seven hundred and seventy-five eligible individuals completed the baseline survey and were presumed alive at the time of follow-up; of these, 54,960 (71.6%) completed the first follow-up survey. Logistic regression models were used to calculate inverse probability weights using propensity scores.

Results: Characteristics associated with a greater probability of response included female gender, older age, higher education level, officer rank, active-duty status, and a self-reported history of military exposures. Ever smokers, those with a history of chronic alcohol consumption or a major depressive disorder, and those separated from the military at follow-up had a lower probability of response. Nonresponse to the follow-up questionnaire did not result in appreciable bias; bias was greatest in subgroups with small numbers.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that prospective analyses from this cohort are not substantially biased by non-response at the first follow-up assessment.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Alcoholism
  • Bias*
  • Cohort Studies*
  • Depressive Disorder, Major
  • Educational Status
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Military Personnel* / psychology
  • Sex Factors
  • Smoking
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Young Adult