Role of PD-1 in Regulating T-cell Immunity

Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2011;350:17-37. doi: 10.1007/82_2010_116.

Abstract

Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is a member of the CD28 superfamily that delivers negative signals upon interaction with its two ligands, PD-L1 or PD-L2. PD-1 and its ligands are broadly expressed and exert a wider range of immunoregulatory roles in T cells activation and tolerance compared with other CD28 members. Subsequent studies show that PD-1-PD-L interaction regulates the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance and protect tissues from autoimmune attack. PD-1 and its ligands are also involved in attenuating infectious immunity and tumor immunity, and facilitating chronic infection and tumor progression. The biological significance of PD-1 and its ligand suggests the therapeutic potential of manipulation of PD-1 pathway against various human diseases. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of PD-1 and its ligands ranging from discovery to clinical significance.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use
  • Antigens, CD / chemistry
  • Antigens, CD / genetics
  • Antigens, CD / immunology
  • Antigens, CD / metabolism*
  • Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins / chemistry
  • Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins / genetics
  • Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins / immunology
  • Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins / metabolism*
  • Autoimmune Diseases / immunology*
  • Chronic Disease
  • Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic
  • Gene Expression Regulation / immunology*
  • Humans
  • Ligands
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred BALB C
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Models, Molecular
  • Neoplasms / immunology*
  • Neoplasms / therapy
  • Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor
  • T-Lymphocytes / immunology*
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Virus Diseases / immunology*
  • Virus Diseases / therapy

Substances

  • Antibodies, Monoclonal
  • Antigens, CD
  • Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins
  • Ligands
  • PDCD1 protein, human
  • Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor