Terrorism and the behavioral sciences

Harv Rev Psychiatry. Nov-Dec 2010;18(6):369-78. doi: 10.3109/10673229.2010.533005.

Abstract

Terrorism has existed for millennia and is a phenomenon well-known to many parts of the world. Americans were forced to recognize this phenomenon, and our vulnerability to it, by two sets of events in 2001: the attacks on New York City and Washington, DC, and the anthrax mailings that followed shortly thereafter. Psychiatry, psychology, and other behavioral and social sciences have been looked to for assistance in collecting and analyzing intelligence data, understanding terrorism, and developing strategies to combat terrorism. In addition to reviewing areas in which the behavioral sciences have made contributions in addressing this problem, this article discusses the developing roles for behavioral scientists in this field.

MeSH terms

  • Anthrax
  • Behavioral Sciences / ethics
  • Behavioral Sciences / legislation & jurisprudence*
  • Biological Warfare / ethics
  • Biological Warfare / legislation & jurisprudence
  • Duty to Warn / ethics
  • Duty to Warn / legislation & jurisprudence
  • Ethics, Medical
  • Expert Testimony / ethics
  • Expert Testimony / legislation & jurisprudence*
  • Homicide / ethics
  • Homicide / legislation & jurisprudence
  • Homicide / psychology
  • Humans
  • Insanity Defense
  • Mental Disorders / diagnosis*
  • Mental Disorders / psychology
  • Patient Advocacy / ethics
  • Patient Advocacy / legislation & jurisprudence
  • Psychotic Disorders / diagnosis
  • Psychotic Disorders / psychology
  • September 11 Terrorist Attacks / ethics
  • Terrorism / ethics
  • Terrorism / legislation & jurisprudence*
  • Terrorism / prevention & control
  • Terrorism / psychology
  • United States