The role of the transcription factor CREB in immune function

J Immunol. 2010 Dec 1;185(11):6413-9. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1001829.

Abstract

CREB is a transcription factor that regulates diverse cellular responses, including proliferation, survival, and differentiation. CREB is induced by a variety of growth factors and inflammatory signals and subsequently mediates the transcription of genes containing a cAMP-responsive element. Several immune-related genes possess this cAMP-responsive element, including IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α. In addition, phosphorylated CREB has been proposed to directly inhibit NF-κB activation by blocking the binding of CREB binding protein to the NF-κB complex, thereby limiting proinflammatory responses. CREB also induces an antiapoptotic survival signal in monocytes and macrophages. In T and B cells, CREB activation promotes proliferation and survival and differentially regulates Th1, Th2, and Th17 responses. Finally, CREB activation is required for the generation and maintenance of regulatory T cells. This review summarizes current advances involving CREB in immune function--a role that is continually being defined.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cell Differentiation / immunology
  • Cell Proliferation
  • Cell Survival / immunology
  • Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein / physiology*
  • Humans
  • Immunity, Cellular

Substances

  • CREB1 protein, human
  • Creb1 protein, mouse
  • Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein