Parkinson's Disease: National Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Management in Primary and Secondary Care

Review
London: Royal College of Physicians (UK); 2006.

Excerpt

It is almost 200 years since James Parkinson described the major symptoms of the disease that came to bear his name. Slowly but surely our understanding of the disease has improved and effective treatment has been developed, but Parkinson’s disease remains a huge challenge to those who suffer from it and to those involved in its management. In addition to the difficulties common to other disabling neurological conditions, the management of Parkinson’s disease must take into account the fact that the mainstay of pharmacological treatment, levodopa, can eventually produce dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Furthermore, there are a number of agents besides levodopa that can help parkinsonian symptoms, and there is the enticing but unconfirmed prospect that other treatments might protect against worsening neurological disability. Thus, a considerable degree of judgement is required in tailoring individual therapy and in timing treatment initiation. It is hoped that this guideline on Parkinson’s disease will be of considerable help to those involved at all levels in these difficult management decisions. The guideline has been produced using standard NICE methodology and is therefore based on a thorough search for best evidence.

Publication types

  • Review
  • Practice Guideline