Collaborative care for the treatment of Hispanic children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Gen Hosp Psychiatry. Nov-Dec 2010;32(6):612-4. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2010.08.004. Epub 2010 Oct 14.

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the use of the collaborative care model in treating Hispanic children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) living in underserved communities.

Methods: The study was implemented in two clinics, one in a rural and one in an urban setting. We evaluated model implementation and used standardized rating scales to assess pre/post-intervention changes in ADHD symptoms. All children were referred and treated by their pediatricians. A care manager conveyed medication recommendations from a child and adolescent psychiatrist to the pediatrician who in turn implemented recommendations. The care manager also provided psychoeducation regarding the causes and management of ADHD.

Results: The model was successfully implemented. Differences were observed across the two clinics. The urban clinic provided more sessions in the first 2 months of treatment, collected more rating scales, provided more psychoeducation, made more medication adjustments, and prescribed higher medication doses. However, children at both sites showed comparable reductions in ADHD symptoms. Parents were satisfied with the collaborative care model. Staff expressed the need for more administrative support in implementing the model.

Conclusions: Collaborative care appears feasible and acceptable for the treatment of Hispanic children with ADHD and shows preliminary evidence of effectiveness.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / diagnosis
  • Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / ethnology*
  • Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / therapy*
  • Central Nervous System Stimulants / therapeutic use
  • Child
  • Combined Modality Therapy
  • Cooperative Behavior*
  • Education
  • Female
  • Health Education
  • Hispanic Americans / psychology*
  • Humans
  • Interdisciplinary Communication*
  • Male
  • Patient Care Management
  • Patient Education as Topic
  • Rural Population
  • Urban Population
  • Washington

Substances

  • Central Nervous System Stimulants