Loss of ATM/Chk2/p53 pathway components accelerates tumor development and contributes to radiation resistance in gliomas

Cancer Cell. 2010 Dec 14;18(6):619-29. doi: 10.1016/j.ccr.2010.10.034.

Abstract

Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential for adult tissue homeostasis and defects in the DNA-damage response (DDR) machinery are linked to numerous pathologies including cancer. Here, we present evidence that the DDR exerts tumor suppressor activity in gliomas. We show that genes encoding components of the DDR pathway are frequently altered in human gliomas and that loss of elements of the ATM/Chk2/p53 cascade accelerates tumor formation in a glioma mouse model. We demonstrate that Chk2 is required for glioma response to ionizing radiation in vivo and is necessary for DNA-damage checkpoints in the neuronal stem cell compartment. Finally, we observed that the DDR is constitutively activated in a subset of human GBMs, and such activation correlates with regions of hypoxia.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins
  • Cell Cycle
  • Cell Cycle Proteins / physiology*
  • Cell Hypoxia
  • Cell Line, Tumor
  • Checkpoint Kinase 2
  • DNA Damage
  • DNA-Binding Proteins / physiology*
  • Glioma / etiology*
  • Glioma / radiotherapy*
  • Humans
  • Mice
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / physiology*
  • Radiation Tolerance*
  • Signal Transduction / physiology*
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / physiology*
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins / physiology*

Substances

  • Cell Cycle Proteins
  • DNA-Binding Proteins
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins
  • Checkpoint Kinase 2
  • ATM protein, human
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins
  • Atm protein, mouse
  • CHEK2 protein, human
  • Chek2 protein, mouse
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases