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Radiological Findings in Acute Haemophilus Influenzae Pulmonary Infection

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Radiological Findings in Acute Haemophilus Influenzae Pulmonary Infection

F Okada et al. Br J Radiol.

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute Haemophilus influenzae pulmonary infection.

Methods: Thin-section CT scans obtained between January 2004 and March 2009 from 434 patients with acute H. influenzae pulmonary infection were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with concurrent infection diseases, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=76), Staphylococcus aureus (n=58) or multiple pathogens (n=89) were excluded from this study. Thus, our study group comprised 211 patients (106 men, 105 women; age range, 16-91 years, mean, 63.9 years). Underlying diseases included cardiac disease (n=35), pulmonary emphysema (n=23), post-operative status for malignancy (n=20) and bronchial asthma (n=15). Frequencies of CT patterns and disease distribution of parenchymal abnormalities, lymph node enlargement and pleural effusion were assessed by thin-section CT.

Results: The CT findings in patients with H. influenzae pulmonary infection consisted mainly of ground-glass opacity (n=185), bronchial wall thickening (n=181), centrilobular nodules (n=137) and consolidation (n=112). These abnormalities were predominantly seen in the peripheral lung parenchyma (n=108). Pleural effusion was found in 22 patients. Two patients had mediastinal lymph node enlargement.

Conclusion: These findings in elderly patients with smoking habits or cardiac disease may be characteristic CT findings of H. influenzae pulmonary infection.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Acute Haemophilus influenzae infection in a 70-year-old woman with cardiac disease at 4 days after onset of fever and cough. A transverse thin-section CT of the right upper lobe shows ground-glass opacity, bronchial wall thickening (arrow) and centrilobular nodules (arrowhead).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Acute Haemophilus influenzae infection in a 55-year-old man with a smoking habit at 3 days after onset of fever and cough. A transverse thin-section CT of the left lower lobe shows consolidation, ground-glass opacity, bronchial wall thickening (arrow) and centrilobular nodules (arrowheads).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Acute Haemophilus influenzae infection in a 74-year-old alcoholic man with pulmonary emphysema at 3 days after onset of fever, cough and dyspnoea. A transverse thin-section CT 2 cm below the tracheal carina shows ground-glass opacity, bronchial wall thickening (arrow) and consolidation (arrowheads).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Acute Haemophilus influenzae infection in a 64-year-old man at 3 days after the onset of cough with sputum. A transverse thin-section CT of the right lower lobe shows ground-glass opacity, bronchial wall thickening (arrow) and centrilobular nodules (arrowheads).

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