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, 12 (3), 367-70

Universal Sensing by Transduction of Antibody Binding With Backscattering Interferometry

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Universal Sensing by Transduction of Antibody Binding With Backscattering Interferometry

Amanda Kussrow et al. Chembiochem.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Schematic representation of the BSI apparatus. Pre-equilibrated solutions of antibodies and ligands in buffer are pipetted into the channels of the microfluidic chip. Channels are interrogated with a 633 nm HeNe laser, and the resulting interference fringes are captured using a CCD camera.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Analyte (top row) and negative control (bottom row) compounds used for BSI testing. (A) – (E) refer to the data shown in Figure 3.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Representative plots of BSI signal vs. ligand concentration for the determination of binding constants for the following pairs of molecules (antibody + small molecule). (squares = “ligand”; diamonds = “control” compound) (A) ligand = dopamine, control = 3-methoxytyramine; (B) ligand = nitrotyrosine, control = tyrosine (C) ligand = trinitrophenol, control = phenol; (D) ligand = serotonin, control = l-tryptophan; (E) ligand = histamine, control = l-histidine; (F) ligand = holo transferrin, control = fully denatured holo transferrin. Each data point represents the average of at least four independent measurements; error bars are plus and minus the full value of standard error in each direction. Repeat determinations of the binding curves gave very similar Kads values.
Figure 4
Figure 4
BSI analysis for TNP in spiked soil samples: positive control = buffer solution of TNP, S1 = garden soil, S2 = beach sand. Each value is the average of three measurements with error bars representing standard deviation.

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