TP53 mutations in nonsmall cell lung cancer

J Biomed Biotechnol. 2011;2011:583929. doi: 10.1155/2011/583929. Epub 2011 Jan 18.

Abstract

The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is frequently mutated in human cancers. Abnormality of the TP53 gene is one of the most significant events in lung cancers and plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. Human lung cancers are classified into two major types, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The latter accounts for approximately 80% of all primary lung cancers, and the incidence of NSCLC is increasing yearly. Most clinical studies suggest that NSCLC with TP53 alterations carries a worse prognosis and may be relatively more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. A deep understanding of the role of TP53 in lung carcinogenesis may lead to a more reasonably targeted clinical approach, which should be exploited to enhance the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. This paper will focus on the role of TP53 in the molecular pathogenesis, epidemiology, and therapeutic strategies of TP53 mutation in NSCLC.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / genetics*
  • Humans
  • Lung Neoplasms / genetics*
  • Mutation*
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics*

Substances

  • TP53 protein, human
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53