Living related donor liver transplantation in children

Transplant Proc. Jan-Feb 2011;43(1):161-4. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2010.11.013.

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to report our experience with pediatric orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with living related donors.

Methods: We performed a retrospective chart analysis of 121 living related donor liver transplantations (LRDLT) from June 1998 to June 2010.

Results: Indications were biliary atresia (BA; n = 81), primary sclerosing cholangitis (n = 5), α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (n = 4); cholestasis (n = 9), fulminant hepatic failure (n = 8), autoimmune hepatitis (n = 2), Alagille syndrome (n = 4), hepatoblastoma (n = 3), tyrosinemia (n = 2), and congenital hepatic fibrosis (n = 3). The age of the recipients ranged from 7-174 months (median, 22) and the weights ranged from 6-58 kg (median, 10). Forty-nine children (40.5%) weighed ≤10 kg. The grafts included the left lateral segment (n = 108), the left lobe (n = 12), and the right lobe (n = 1). The donors included 71 mothers, 45 fathers, 2 uncles, 1 grandmother, 1 grandfather, and 1 sister with a median age of 29 years (range, 16-53 ys) and a median weight of 68 kg (range, 47-106). Sixteen patients (12.9%) required retransplantation, most commonly due to hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT; n = 13; 10.7%). The other complications were biliary stenosis (n = 25; 20.6%), portal vein thrombosis (PVT; n = 11; 9.1%), portal vein stenosis (n = 5; 4.1%), hepatic vein stenosis (n = 6; 4.9%), and lymphoproliferative disorders (n = 8; 6.6%). The ultimate survival rate of recipients was 90.3% after 1 year and 75.8% after 3 years. Causes of early death within 1 month were HAT (n = 6), PVT (n = 2), severe graft dysfunction (n = 1), sepsis (n = 1), and intraoperative death in children with acute liver failure (n = 2). Causes of late deaths included lymphoproliferative disease (n = 3), chronic rejection (n = 2), biliary complications (n = 3), and recurrent disease (n = 3; hepatoblastoma and primary sclerosing cholangitis).

Conclusions: Despite the heightened possibility of complications (mainly vascular), LRDLT represented a good alternative to transplantation from cadaveric donors in pediatric populations. It was associated with a high survival ratio.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Child
  • Family*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Immunosuppressive Agents / administration & dosage
  • Liver Transplantation*
  • Living Donors*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Retrospective Studies

Substances

  • Immunosuppressive Agents