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Case Reports
. 2011 May;51(1):79-82.
doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2011.01.018. Epub 2011 Feb 20.

Human Rhinovirus C--associated Severe Pneumonia in a Neonate

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Free PMC article
Case Reports

Human Rhinovirus C--associated Severe Pneumonia in a Neonate

Eeva Broberg et al. J Clin Virol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

We present a case of severe pneumonia, associated with a prolonged infection by a species C rhinovirus (HRV) in a 3-week old neonate. HRV RNA was identified in nasal and nasopharyngeal secretions, bronchoalveolar lavage and bronchial specimens, stool and urine, collected from the patient during a one-month period. No other viral or bacterial agents were detected. Sequence analysis of two regions of the viral genome, amplified directly from the clinical specimens revealed a novel HRV-C variant. These observations highlight the occurrence of severe neonatal infections caused by HRVs and the need of rapid viral diagnostics for their detection.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Copy number measurements in different respiratory specimens (triangles) and feces (squares) from the patient after a severe infection with human rhinovirus species C. Details of the respiratory specimens are indicated in Table 1.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Phylogenetic analysis of the VP4/2 coding region of the patient case (UTU-09RD301, GenBank accession number HQ714958) and selected published HRV sequences. For the HRV C cluster, the GenBank numbers of the partial sequences are shown. The evolutionary history was inferred using the neighbor-joining method. The bootstrap consensus tree inferred from 1000 replicates is taken to represent the evolutionary history of the taxa analyzed. The tree is drawn to scale, with branch lengths in the same units as those of the evolutionary distances used to infer the phylogenetic tree. The evolutionary distances were computed using the maximum composite likelihood method and are in the units of the number of base substitutions per site. Branches corresponding to partitions reproduced in less than 50% bootstrap replicates were collapsed. Virus sequences with >98% nucleotide identities were considered same. Coxsackievirus A 21 and HRV-68 sequences were used as outgroups.

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