Trends in Type 1 diabetes incidence in the UK in 0- to 14-year-olds and in 15- to 34-year-olds, 1991-2008

Diabet Med. 2011 Jul;28(7):811-4. doi: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2011.03288.x.

Abstract

Aim: To describe Type 1 diabetes incidence trends in the UK between 1991 and 2008 in children aged 0-14 years and in young adults aged 15-34 years.

Methods: Data from the UK General Practice Research Database were analysed, including 3002 individuals (1565 aged 0-14 years and 1437 aged 15-34 years) newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Poisson regression was used to model annual incidence increases and seasonality effects.

Results: Type 1 diabetes incidence increased from 11 to 24/100,000 person-years in boys and from 15 to 20/100,000 person-years in girls. In adults, the incidence rate increased from 13 to 20/100,000 person-years (men) and from 7 to 10/100,000 person-years (women). Annual incidence increases tended to be greater in children (4.1%, 95% CI 3.0-5.2%) compared with 15- to 34-year-olds (2.8%, 95% CI 1.6-3.9%). There was evidence of higher incidence rates during autumn and winter in children, but not in adults.

Conclusions: A continuing increase in Type 1 diabetes incidence was shown that was greater in children than in young adults. Seasonal variation was observed in children only.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Age of Onset
  • Child
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / epidemiology*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Male
  • Models, Statistical
  • Seasons
  • Sex Distribution
  • United Kingdom / epidemiology
  • Young Adult